Sub-second Dynamics of Theta-Gamma Coupling in Hippocampal CA1 (bibtex)
by , , and
Abstract:
Oscillatory brain activity reflects different internal brain states including neurons’ excitatory state and synchrony among neurons. However, characterizing these states is complicated by the fact that different oscillations are often coupled, such as gamma oscillations nested in theta in the hippocampus, and changes in coupling are thought to reflect distinct states. Here, we describe a new method to separate single oscillatory cycles into distinct states based on frequency and phase coupling. Using this method, we identified four theta-gamma coupling states in rat hippocampal CA1. These states differed in abundance across behaviors, phase synchrony with other hippocampal subregions, and neural coding properties suggesting that these states are functionally distinct. We captured cycle-to-cycle changes in oscillatory coupling states and found frequent switching between theta-gamma states showing that the hippocampus rapidly shifts between different functional states. This method provides a new approach to investigate oscillatory brain dynamics broadly.
Reference:
Sub-second Dynamics of Theta-Gamma Coupling in Hippocampal CA1L. Zhang, J. Lee, C.J. Rozell and A.C. Singer. eLife, vol. 8, pp. e44320, July 2019.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{zhang.18,
  author = {Zhang, L. and Lee, J. and Rozell, C.J. and Singer, A.C.},
  title = {Sub-second Dynamics of Theta-Gamma Coupling in Hippocampal {CA1}},
  year = 2019,
  journal = {eLife},  
  volume = 8,
  month = jul,
  pages = {e44320},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.44320},
  abstract = {Oscillatory brain activity reflects different internal brain states including neurons’ excitatory state and synchrony among neurons. However, characterizing these states is complicated by the fact that different oscillations are often coupled, such as gamma oscillations nested in theta in the hippocampus, and changes in coupling are thought to reflect distinct states. Here, we describe a new method to separate single oscillatory cycles into distinct states based on frequency and phase coupling. Using this method, we identified four theta-gamma coupling states in rat hippocampal CA1. These states differed in abundance across behaviors, phase synchrony with other hippocampal subregions, and neural coding properties suggesting that these states are functionally distinct. We captured cycle-to-cycle changes in oscillatory coupling states and found frequent switching between theta-gamma states showing that the hippocampus rapidly shifts between different functional states. This method provides a new approach to investigate oscillatory brain dynamics broadly.}  
}
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