Measuring information transfer in crayfish sustaining fiber spike generators (bibtex)
by , and
Abstract:
We present a method based on information-theoretic distances for measuring the information transfer efficiency of voltage to impulse encoders. In response to light pulses, we simultaneously recorded the EPSP and spiking output of crayfish sustaining fibers. To measure the distance between analog EPSP responses, we developed a membrane noise model that accurately captures stimulus-induced nonstationarities. By comparing the EPSP and spike responses, we found encoding efficiencies on the order of $10^{-4}$, with interesting dynamics occurring during initial transients. A simple analog to point-process converter predicted the small information transfer efficiencies and dynamic properties we measured.
Reference:
Measuring information transfer in crayfish sustaining fiber spike generatorsC.J. Rozell, D.H. Johnson and R.M. Glantz. Biological Cybernetics, 90(2), pp. 89–97, February 2004.
Bibtex Entry:
@ARTICLE{rozell.04,
  author = {Rozell, C.J. and Johnson, D.H. and Glantz, R.M.},
  title = {Measuring information transfer in crayfish sustaining fiber spike generators},
  journal = {Biological Cybernetics},
  year = {2004},
  volume = {90},
  number = {2},
  pages = {89--97},
  month = {February},
  webnote = {Copyright held by Springer-Verlag. The original
	 publication is available at springerlink.com. DOI:10.1007/s00422-003-0458-y},
  abstract = {We present a method based
	 on information-theoretic distances for measuring the information
	 transfer efficiency of voltage to impulse encoders. In response to light
	 pulses, we simultaneously recorded the EPSP and spiking output of
	 crayfish sustaining fibers. To measure the distance between analog
	 EPSP responses, we developed a membrane noise model that accurately
	 captures stimulus-induced nonstationarities. By comparing the EPSP
	 and spike responses, we found encoding efficiencies on the order
	 of $10^{-4}$, with interesting dynamics occurring during initial
	 transients. A simple analog to point-process converter predicted the small
	 information transfer efficiencies and dynamic properties we measured.},
  url = {http://siplab.gatech.edu/pubs/rozellBC2004.pdf},
}
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